Birth imprinting – SkinToSkin contact

As a child is born to a mother there are emotional , hormonal, physical and psychological needs that are satisfied when SkinToSkin contact occurs and these will give both short and long term health benefits to mother and child .

A mother should be the first person to touch her newborn and that is one of the reasons that midwives should wear gloves. The mother’s skin will imprint the newborn with her smell, touch and love – the newborns face, smell and skin will imprint onto the mother and these are processes which are golden moments not to be missed .

If a mother is feeling unwell or anaesthetised the midwife should hold the newborn next to the mother’s skin for her , taking photographs with the mother’s phone or camera will enable the first sight of the baby to be saved and also surpass consent issues around photographs- the parents can then choose what they show to others and what they keep .

A Midwife is the woman’s and the newborn’s advocate and it’s crucial that the Midwife finds a way to involve the second parent in skin to skin contact somehow after the mother has held her newborn for a sufficient time to enable the first breastfeed .

If a woman wants to breastfeed once this has the benefit of giving colostrum as a gut protector and immuniser- colostrum contains immunoglobulin.

In cases of premature birth courage , knowledge, dexterity and skill are needed to enable skin to skin to take place . The value of collaboration (as discussed by @CharleneSTMW at a recent MatExp event at Warwick Hospitals cannot be understated – all members of the team must be aware of the benefits of SkinToSkin contact at Caesarean or instrumental birth .

We must all sing from the same sheet and share the same values so that everyone agrees that skin to skin with mother takes place before any other intervention .

Skin to skin is not an intervention it is something as natural as putting your key into your front door without thinking about it . However it seems that women and newborns are in a postcode lottery – where you live and which hospital you attend for your birth can determine and influence your chance of skin to skin .

I receive many requests from midwives from the NHS and across the world asking me to help them overcome barriers to facilitating skin to skin contact within their workplaces especially in the operating theatre . Some are stopped by anaesthetists, obstetricians , some ridiculed as strange by their colleagues and told “it’s not happening here” . We must remember that nothing is final and show the evidence which is growing by the day that skin to skin contact is not something that can be measured , it’s a primitive response which comes as second nature to a new mother – if that mother is out of her comfort zone she won’t have the strength or courage to question why – that’s OUR JOB !

Many ago I recall being told by some midwives “it won’t be happening – it’s too complicated ” and now I smile as I see midwives like @jenistevenssts in Australia studying skin to skin in the operating theatre for her PhD thesis, NICE GUIDANCE CG190 even includes SkinToSkin thanks to midwives like @drtraceyc who campaigned for its involvement and birth activist @millihill writing about it in her book (picture below)

The priceless value SkinToSkin is spreading across the world and if it’s not happening I’d like YOU to question why

This blog is dedicated to my mum Dorothy Guiney 22.2.1925 – 22.9.1978 ❤️

My wonderful mum 

On 22.9.1978 at around 6pm my dear mum died. I was 18 years old and it felt so unreal when it happened . I always imagined she’d come back to me . I still dream about her vividly and feel her presence close to me each day . 

My mum was an ordinary mum , she had no airs and graces , I never heard her talk badly of anyone, she was an extremely kind soul who saw the good in everyone . My mum was always making people laugh , she was also a fabulous baker, never learnt to drive and had a great relationship with her sister Hilda who used to take her away on sisterly weekends once in a while  – my dear Auntie  Hilda outlived my mum by over 26 years and she shared many memories of their childhood with me over those years – and I treasure these stories .

 I don’t ever really remember my mum shouting at me or my sisters, she taught me how to be a good person and gave me an insight into why being a good mother is so fundamental to a child’s life and how a mothers love can shape the person that we become . 

Every year on on the 22nd February (my mums birthday ) and the 22nd September I celebrate her life by buying flowers and writing about her in one of my journals . 

My mum gave me a good life , because we lived in a shop she was always there every morning , every afternoon when I got home from school  – I didn’t realise how lucky I was until just recently . 

One thing my mum used to say to me was “if you really believe in something try to stand up for it and don’t let it it go” I see now that believing in skin to skin is not something I am ever going to let go of . 

My mum gave me a firm foundation in my life – and this blog is my way of thanking her 

Thank you for reading,  

With love & kindness 

Jenny 💛

Dedicated to my mum 

Dorothy Guiney 22.2.1925 – 22.9.1978